Mommy Reblog: Building Your Child’s Creativity and Emotional Health Through Music

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Angela England, a mother of five from Oklahoma, shares her thoughts on how music can help build your child’s creativity and emotional health. She writes for Mom Blog Society.

Creativity Skills in Music Education

As children move from attentive listeners to beginning performers, they begin to express more and more self-expression. They learn how to adapt work from their favorite composers or genres to adapt their own styles. Not only does this build their self-esteem as they accomplish difficult works, but they can express their thoughts and emotions through what is essentially a different language – music.

Improved Happiness Levels

Students who were studying music self-reported more positive emotions like optimism, joy, friendliness, etc. after sessions of listening to or working with music. These positive emotions were reported as enhanced if they were already feeling positive emotions, or said to have a change of mood if negative feelings were previously present. Of course, this is no surprise to any musician, but it’s nice to see these findings beginning to be quantified.

Physiological Responses

Since music can lower blood pressure, increase dopamine levels, and decreases feelings of distress, it’s beneficial to many. It can actually improve recovery times after illness or surgery. And of course, if someone is feeling anxious or even having difficulty sleeping, music can have a profound effect.

Mom and son

Unique Brain Patterns

A fascinating study done by musician and mathematician Parag Chordia, showed with MRIs how improvisation uses the brain in a different and unique way than rote memorization performance. Music is a brilliant way of practicing these improvisational techniques which are also used in innovation skills needed for breakthroughs in higher maths and sciences.

Group Communication Skills

Communicating in a group for performing with multiple friends, takes a different set of skills than solo performances. Your child has to learn a different level of give and take, as well as adapting his own preferences to the rest of the group when working in this way.

Share the Kindermusik Joy!
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