Do Music? Yep, You’re Probably Smarter

Parent Perspective

Study after study after study in respected, peer-reviewed journals in a variety of fields tell us the same thing over and over, and we don’t mind pointing it out each time a new researcher adds to the heap of science telling us what we already know: if you make music, it positively impacts other areas of learning. In other words, music makes you smarter!

Continue reading “Do Music? Yep, You’re Probably Smarter”

Music As Language

Brain

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Oh, the directions we could take this article! Written music is a language. Phrase structure…how a piece of music unfolds section by section can be considered a language. And like any language, the more you experience these aspects of music, the easier they are to understand. When you get used to Bach’s compositional language, you are more likely to spot a piece by Bach you don’t know. The same can be said for Miles Davis’s playing or James Taylor’s style. If you’ve experienced a lot of those artists’ output, you know their “language” when you hear it.

But that’s not what we are talking about today. Our brains actually process music much like our brains process language. Let’s science!!! (Yes…I used science as a verb. It’s okay. Roll with it.)


[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Jazz Improv and Dr. Charles Limb: Otolaryngological Surgeon and Musician

What is improv in jazz? Well, first, it’s music made up on the spot, following agreed-upon rules, like tonal center, meter, and duration. It’s almost like a good debate. One person expresses their views and then another person counters. This happens often in jazz, this dialogue. Dr. Limb decided he wanted to learn more. He wanted to see what was going on in the brain of a performing musician. From The Atlantic:

He and a team of researchers conducted a study that involved putting a musician in a functional MRI machine with a keyboard, and having him play a memorized piece of music and then a made-up piece of music as part of an improvisation with another musician in a control room.

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Language
Dr. Charles Limb

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]What did Dr. Limb discover? While taking part in these jazz dialogues, while musicians improvise with other musicians, the parts of the brain that process language light up on the MRI. What’s more important, the area of the brain specifically linked to syntax, the arrangement of words to construct well-formed sentences in a language, also lit up.

Jazz Dialogue is Language – with an Interesting Difference

While the brain’s language areas light up while conversing in jazz, there is a substantial difference that actually makes sense. Syntax areas respond – but semantic areas do not. What does this mean? Semantics has to do with meaning. When speaking or listening to a sentence, the brain will work out structure (syntax) and meaning (semantics). When dealing with improvised jazz, the parts of the brain responsible for meaning are dormant.

Ok. What does that mean? Dr. Lamb explains:

Music communication, we know it means something to the listener, but that meaning can’t really be described,” Limb said. “It doesn’t have propositional elements or specificity of meaning in the same way a word does. So a famous bit of music—Beethoven’s dun dun dun duuuun—we might hear that and think it means something but nobody could agree what it means.

– Dr. Lamb/The Atlantic

 [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Victor Wooten, a bassist, composer, and author, expands on this idea in his TedEd video:[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_video link=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=13&v=3yRMbH36HRE”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Dr. Lamb’s TedTalk is pretty interesting. Take a look and see what you think.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_video link=”https://www.ted.com/talks/charles_limb_your_brain_on_improv”][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Interview: Paige Hays and Brain Architecture

Paige Hays

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Stay tuned for an interview with Paige Hays, Occupational Therapist!

 

Paige HaysI am a licensed and registered occupational therapist with extensive experience and expertise in working with children with developmental needs. I have always been drawn to helping children. I starting building my knowledge and skills while an undergraduate student by studying behavioral therapy techniques and working with children on the autism spectrum using ABA therapy. I paired my undergraduate degree in psychology with a master’s of science in occupational therapy from Washington University in St. Louis. The combination of psychology (I love studying the brain and how it works) and occupational therapy (which focuses on functioning in daily life) has given me the basis to best help children and families.  My clinical experience ranges from infants through young adults. I’ve worked in school, in-patient, and out-patient settings. I’ve worked with children with most major developmental disabilities, as well as specializing in children with rare disorders or complex medical needs. I provide care that integrates several therapeutic approaches: behavioral, developmental, sensory, cognitive, and neuro-developmental, with a focus on providing evidence-based interventions for families and children. My areas of expertise include executive functioning in children, behavior management, and neuro-developmental treatment (I completed the Pediatric Neurodevelopment Treatment training program in 2012). My wide range of clinical experience allows me to assist children with a variety of needs and children with multiple areas of needs.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

How Music Affects your Mood and your Mind

Music and mood

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]With over 30 years of observing children and adults in the Kindermusik classroom, we know from experience that music has a huge effect on the emotions. Science and research continue to affirm what we also suspect, and that is that music can significantly impact cognition as well – in the early years and later in life as we age.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]And so we find articles like Music & the Brain: The Fascinating Ways Music Affects Your Mood and Mind to be very intriguing and incredibly confirming of the wonderful benefits of being enrolled in a music program like Kindermusik.  The author of the article, Barry Goldstein, points out four ways that consistent participation in a “…musical program can target and enhance certain brain functions.”  Here’s a quick summary of those four benefits that Goldstein identifies.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

Emotion

Music actually affects the brain emotionally because of the way specific brain circuits are wired to respond to music. The closeness and bonding times that come through singing and dancing together actually release the feel-good hormone, oxytocin, also known as the “cuddle hormone.” And when listening to music touches us emotionally, it’s because there’s a neurotransmitter produced in the brain, called dopamine, that helps feel the pleasure and connection of music.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

music and mood
This little guy has found joy in music making.

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Memory

Even when the mind is debilitated by the effects of Alzheimer’s, it can still be awakened when the patient hears music from his younger years to which he had an emotional connection. One of the most beautiful illustrations of this is an elderly man named Henry who was featured in the movie Alive Inside. Watch this and see if it doesn’t move you to tears! The music we love creates memories that stay with us for all of our lives.

Check out this charming older couple making music together.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_video link=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RI-l0tK8Ok0″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

Learning and Neuroplasticity

Did you know that the brain can literally reorganize itself by forming new neural connections?  And that the formation of new neural connections can be significantly affected by music?  We see this documented in extreme cases of brain damage when music is one of the stimuli used to cause the brain to rewire itself.  For example, music therapy and singing were instrumental in helping former congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords learn how to speak again.  If music has this kind of powerful effect on a brain that’s suffered trauma, just think of what effects music can have on a healthy brain![/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

Gabrielle Giffords used music therapy as part of her recovery process.
Gabrielle Giffords used music therapy as part of her recovery process.

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Attention

Unlike any other medium, music has the unique capability o capture our full attention, and as a result, can “activate, sustain, and improve our attention.”  In a culture that’s full of distractions, the ability to focus our busy minds and allow our brains and our hearts to connect, we can find true balance and deep-seated joy.  This wonderful phenomenon can occur for both adults and children alike.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]All of this research and brain “stuff” can be a little dry; we admit it. But it also underscores the amazing and powerful effects of music, no matter what age or what stage of development the mind and emotions are in. Understanding a little of the science behind the powerful effects of music on our minds and emotions makes it all the more meaningful when experience music together in our Kindermusik classes. It reinforces again the immeasurable and lifelong value of early childhood music classes – something the children adore and memories that we as adults can hold in our hearts long after those precious years of childhood are left behind.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Shared by Theresa Case whose Kindermusik program at Piano Central Studios in Greenville, SC, has given her a heart full of songs and musical memories that she knows she’ll enjoy for the rest of her life.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Everyone Can Sing

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]A recent article, written by Northwestern music education professor, Steven M. Demorest, over at The Conversation, an “independent source of news and views from the academic and research community, delivered direct to the public,” explored the idea of musical talent.

The most telling fact, one that I have been aware of for most of my career as a choral conductor, is that adults who consider themselves unmusical were often told that they couldn’t sing as children. Prof. Demorest relates part of the story of Sing, an Oscar-winning short film from Hungary about a girl named Zsófi.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

Sing tells the story of young Zsófi, who joins a renowned children’s choir at her elementary school where “everyone is welcome.”

Soon after joining, Zsófi is told by her teacher Erika not to sing, but only mouth the words. On the face of it, she accepts her teacher’s request stoically. But later in the movie, her anguish and pain become obvious, when she reluctantly tells her best friend what happened.

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Dr. Steven Demorest
Dr. Steven Demorest

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Our culture has become obsessed with the idea of “talent.” The concept that making music is reserved for the revered few is promoted by shows like America’s Got Talent and The Voice. I don’t want to take away from the entertainment value of these shows – the people that perform on them are certainly gifted. But the reality is this: every child is born a natural musician. They sing and dance and make music from the very beginning. They are surrounded by music – so – they respond by mimicking what they hear. If this inherent ability is fostered the benefits are life-changing.[/vc_column_text][blockquote cite=”Dr. Steven Demorest, Northwestern University”]”…indeed every child has musical ability that can be developed into a satisfying and lifelong relationship with music.”[/blockquote][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Negative feedback can come from many different places, especially peers. Sadly, it can also come from music educators and even parents. This has a lasting effect on self-esteem and the desire to make music, especially singing. Singing is an intensely personal activity. It’s just you – no external instrument. You can’t put the instrument down and ignore it. You carry it with you. When the singing voice is disparaged, it is very difficult to not allowed that disparagement have an impact on the entire self.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

Combating the “Talent Mindset” with the “Growth Mindset”

Carol Dweck, psychologist, author, and professor, researches why and how people succeed. Here’s the main point of “Growth Mindset”:

Students who view their success as a result of hard work will persevere through challenges, while students who believe their success lies with some innate ability – like “talent” – are more likely to give up.

Watch Dr. Dweck’s TEDTalk below.[/vc_column_text][vc_video link=”https://vimeo.com/226460812″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]sing[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]

Encourage, Encourage, Encourage

So what can we do to get kids on board the train destined for a lifelong connection with music? The most important thing we can do is getting them started early. This is one of the reasons Kindermusik classes are open to newborn infants. To be surrounded by music from birth helps set the tone for that lifelong connection. As the child grows, immersed in musical experiences coupled with positive support of their musical activity from parents and educators, their confidence in music making will grow as well – and the host of social, emotional, and cognitive benefits music provides will be part of their life’s journey.

Dr. Demorest tells us that perhaps the most important impact on a child’s desire to continue to make music is having an example of music making in the home.

…if you are a parent, you could sing the music you loved growing up and not worry about how good you sound. Having an adult in the home committed to music and singing without shame may be the most powerful influence on a child. You could sing with your kids from the time they are little, sing with the radio, sing in the car or sing at the dinner table.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]sing[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]Along with Dr. Demorest, I find the Hungarian title of Sing very telling. It’s Mindenki, which is Hungarian for…Everybody. It’s perfect, isn’t it? I firmly believe that music is for everybody, especially singing. And when you sing with others you are more likely to have empathy for them, to listen to them when they share their ideas. You become part of a community.

I always tell my students that the main reason we have a singing voice is to give it away to others. That’s certainly true, but for young children, the singing voice allows them to express their joy in a way words alone cannot. It can heal the spirit and free the mind.

Start ’em young and keep ’em singing. They’ll thank you for it later.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][class_finder_form css=”.vc_custom_1500653314338{padding-top: 20px !important;padding-right: 20px !important;padding-bottom: 20px !important;padding-left: 20px !important;}”][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Alex and Music’s Magic: A Kindermusik Story

Kindermusik Story

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Mark and Kim Elicker and their son Ethan were a wonderful family, but they all had so much more love to give. About six years ago they traveled to China to adopt two year old Alex. This is his story – a story of endless love and musical magic.


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Kindermusik for Ethan

Before Alex came home to his family, Kim, an early childhood educator herself, took her son Ethan to Kindermusik from the time he was a baby until he aged out. Lydia Klinger was their Kindermusik educator and really drew the family in. Kim shares why she choose Kindermusik:

Lydia was the reason we started and fell in love with the program. With Ethan I admit I valued the social benefits of being with other Mom’s and families. As an early childhood educator I connected with the developmental appropriateness of the curriculum. Years later when we adopted Alex, I once again became a stay at home mom and I wanted that connection to other families. I chose Kindermusik again with Alex because I loved it so much with Ethan, but I honestly, remember seeking activities that I believed would foster our bond and attachment.

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The day Alex legally became a member of the Elicker family!
The day Alex legally became a member of the Elicker family!

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Alex Comes Home

When Alex came home with the Elickers at age two he wasn’t very verbal. He was a child surrounded by sounds he had never heard. Occasionally, he’d speak a word or two of Mandarin, like mā-ma (mother), bà-ba (father), gē-ge (older brother), and siè-sie (thank you).

Dr. Boyle: When Alex came home with you, how would you describe him?

Kim Elicker: He was quiet and energetic, though when he first came home he didn’t have a lot of stamina. He was curious and resourceful! He could play with a bucket, a box of crayons, and a paper bag. That was just him – he didn’t need anything fancy.

DB: You mentioned he wasn’t very verbal.

KE: He wasn’t. And that’s a typical very typical of children who are adopted into a family who speaks a different language than he was born into.

DB: Right…so what he had been hearing for the first two years of his life, he’s wasn’t hearing that any more and was a completely different environment for him.

KE: Exactly. In our situation, everything changed – what he saw, what he heard, what he smelled, even what touched his skin. It was all very different.

DB: So…you shared with me that on days he was going to Kindermusik, Alex tended to be more verbal.

KE: Yes. In the beginning, receptively he picked up English rather quickly. He was following simple one step directions.

DB: Little kids are sponges.

KE: Yes! But his communication pretty much shut down verbally. We expected that from classes we took before the adoption. His brain was switching gears. We read to him, we talked to him, we engaged him all the time, but he didn’t attempt to speak a lot.

When we started Kindermusik, in the beginning much of it was listening in that particular first program he was in. I noticed his concentration level – his focus – was very intent. He would be very tired those afternoons after Kindermusik in the morning!

By his second set of classes, I started noticing a change. We’d go to Kindermusik, we’d have lunch, and the rest of the day he’d be much more talkative. He’d attempt new words. Anytime he tried new words, it seemed to be on Kindermusik days. Once I noticed the pattern, I really started paying attention to it. It followed this trend for about a year.

DB: And did you take part in the classes with him?

KE: Yes.

DB: That’s great. There’s all this research out there that tells us that because of the way music impacts the brain, when you make music with another person, it builds empathy between you and the other person, it builds trust between you and that other person. You can become more comfortable with that person when you share a musical experience.

KE: That’s an interesting take on my situation. When you are first adopting you need to build trust. That’s part of the attachment process. It’s an interesting thing for me to hear you say – it makes total sense![/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

Alex and Ethan
Ethan and Alex having fun in the band room.

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]DB: Sounds like Kindermusik was an important part of Alex’s process.

KE: Yes! I remember sharing the news of Alex’s increased verbal activity with Lydia, our Kindermusik educator. She said it just gave her chills! She was excited to get that feedback.

DB: I would imagine! Kindermusik is certainly fun with music and movement, but the mission is really to help kids develop socially and emotionally…getting them to interface with other kids and have positive interactions with adults. It helps them move through those developmental domains.

KE: Certainly. And in our case, it was quite obvious because he wasn’t really verbal at all…it was very easy to pick up on when was happening.

DB: It’s just so cool to hear about this – a very specific situation in which music helped a child affected by a rather involved transition find his voice. That’s music reaching parts of the brain that everyday speech or conversation does not. I would imagine that music coupled with music was helpful.

KE: Yes! That was his other area. According to the typical US standard, he would have been lacking in gross motor. Within six months he had caught up. The movement in the class was beneficial.

DB: That’s great. So how long did Alex do Kindermusik?

KE: He was five, almost six when we stopped. When we love something we stick with it![/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

Kindermusik Educator
Lydia Klinger, the Elicker’s Kindermusik Educator, with Ethan, and guest trumpet player Allen Vizzuti.

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]Kindermusik was a very important part of the Elickers lives. Ethan, now 15, lives for the trumpet and plays as often as he can. And Alex? He’s going into third grade this fall. He’s taking piano lessons and singing in church. His ultimate goal is to play organ!

Lydia, their Kindermusik Educator, retired after 20 years of serving musical smiles to her community. She now plays with the Harrisburg Symphony. The Elickers still keep in touch with her. Recently, she arranged a meeting with the Symphony’s guest trumpeter, Allen Vizzuti and Ethan.

For the Elickers, participating in Kindermusik classes helped smooth the complex process of an international adoption, helping Alex open up and explore his verbal possibilities in his new language. As an educator, Kim knew exactly what was happening. As a mom, she got to see music work its magic in her son’s young life. Friends, that’s why Kindermusik Educators do what they do. They are in it to change lives.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

Ethan prepares to play a duet with a friend.
Alex prepares to play a duet with a friend.

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Music’s Effect on the Developmental Domains

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]When we say that music is a powerful tool for learning, one of the biggest reasons is because music positively affects every area of a child’s development.  And for over 30 years, one of the strongest advocates for early childhood development through music and movement has been Kindermusik International.

With a music and movement curriculum entrenched in research and infused with joyful activities that make learning effortlessly fun, it’s no wonder that parents, experts, therapists, and doctors have recommended Kindermusik over and over again for an experience that inspires giggles, bonding, and learning in every critical area of a young child’s development.

But don’t just take our word for it.  For some enlightening and fascinating resources, here are the links to some of that incredible research that is at the core of all that Kindermusik was founded, created, and built upon – research that continues to be affirmed over and over by further research and advances in technology.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Cognitive Development

Graphic-Learning-Domain-Icons-single-cognition-144x144[/vc_column_text][vc_video link=”https://vimeo.com/222523817″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Language & Literacy Development

Graphic-Learning-Domain-Icons-single-language-literacy-144x144[/vc_column_text][vc_video link=”https://vimeo.com/222523998″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Math & Logic Development

Graphic-Learning-Domain-Icon-Math-Logic-144x144[/vc_column_text][vc_video link=”https://vimeo.com/222524206″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Social-Emotional Development

Graphic-Learning-Domain-Icons-single-social-emotional-144x144[/vc_column_text][vc_video link=”https://vimeo.com/222524484″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Physical Development

Graphic-Learning-Domain-Icons-single-physical-144x144[/vc_column_text][vc_video link=”https://vimeo.com/222524639″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Creative Development

Graphic-Learning-Domain-Icons-single-creative-144x144[/vc_column_text][vc_video link=”https://vimeo.com/222524801″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Musical Development

Graphic-Learning-Domain-Icons-single-music-144x144[/vc_column_text][vc_video link=”https://vimeo.com/222525015″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]It doesn’t take an expert to see how every part of a child’s heart, soul, and mind can be powerfully impacted for a lifetime by early childhood music and movement classes.  That’s why so many of us believe in the power of music, and because of that, believe in everything that is completely delightful and utterly magical about Kindermusik.

Want to learn more? Download these research studies from Kindermusik International.


[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]Shared by Theresa Case, who’s been making a difference in the lives of children and families through her award-winning Kindermusik program at Piano Central Studios in Greenville, South Carolina, for over 20 years now.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Science Center Stage: Kids’ Brains Grow Faster with Music

Brain

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]We don’t just think music instruction has a cognitive impact; we know it does.  The science to prove it continues to pile up.  And it’s pretty exciting stuff when you’re talking about things like MRI’s, EEG’s, and behavioral testing being part of the proof.

A recent study, begun by the Brain and Creativity Institute at USC back in 2012 has just revealed some impressive findings.  The study actually showed that “…music instruction speeds up the maturation of the auditory pathway in the brain and increases its efficiency.”  In other words, your brain works better if you’ve had musical instruction!

“Within two years of the study, the neuroscientists found the auditory systems of children in the music program were maturing faster in them than in the other children. The fine-tuning of their auditory pathway could accelerate their development of language and reading, as well as other abilities – a potential effect which the scientists are continuing to study.”

Kindermusik International has long recognized the connection between music instruction and brain development.  You can’t teach a baby to play the piano or violin, but you can still give them rich and powerful early experiences with music that activate and actually change the brain through music and movement activities.

 

brains
That smile betrays musical fun…impacting brain development!

 

It is through a curriculum that combines the power of early music experiences for newborns to big kids in a developmentally appropriate setting that Kindermusik is able to deliver a unique music learning experience that puts a song in each child’s heart, helps parents and children bond, and gives kids a chance to play and be kids – all while giving them an early cognitive advantage through singing, dancing, playing instruments, and moving.

But don’t just take our word for it… check out the science for yourself.  Kids’ brains really do grow faster, stronger, and happier with music and music classes like Kindermusik!  And you’ll both have a lot of happy memories of songs, giggles, and together time to treasure forever too.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Shared by Theresa Case who loves that kids’ eyes, hearts, and brains have been lighting up for over 20 years now in their Kindermusik classes at Piano Central Studios, where she is the Director.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Bilingual Babies: Musical Benefits!

Bilingual Baby

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]An article with a title like, “Bilingual Babies Are Better at Detecting Musical Sounds, Research Shows”, definitely captures our attention here at Kindermusik!  What’s just as fascinating to us as anything else is how this article identifies benefits of bilingualism that are also benefits of beginning to learn the universal language of music at a very young age.

For example, our Kindermusik library of music includes songs in other languages and music from around the world.  And just like “exposure to multiple languages may sharpen infants’ music sensitivity in the first year after birth,” according to new research cited in the article, exposure to the language of music through a variety of music sung in other languages and music from other cultures also enhances both language development and musical sensitivity.

But it’s not only language development that’s enhanced by being musically “multilingual.”  Other benefits also referenced in this article include:

  • Enhanced listening skills
  • More abstract thinking skills
  • Heightened ability to discriminate between sounds
  • More sensitivity to visual cues in language
  • Better social communication skills
  • Increased capacity for working memory
  • Greater cognitive functionality

It’s clear that early exposure to the language of music has some surprising short- and long-term benefits.  But with over 30 years as the world’s leader in music and movement education, all of us here at Kindermusik know from all of the smiles, giggles, and hugs that there are also lots of happy together time and magical moments of bonding and together time as a result of learning music in a class like Kindermusik too!


 

Shared by Theresa Case, director of Piano Central Studios in Greenville, SC[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]